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Walsh Offers:
  • Local Moving
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  • Commercial Relocation
  • Free Use of Wardrobes Boxes on every move
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  • Experienced
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Serving: Anaheim, Artesia, Bellflower, Buena Park, Carson, Cerritos, Compton, Costa Mesa, Culver City, Cypress, Downey, El Segundo, Fountain Valley, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Gardena, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Huntington Beach, Inglewood, Irvine, La Mirada, La Palma, Lakewood, Lawndale, Lennox, Lomita, Long Beach, Los Alamitos, Lynwood, Manhattan Beach, Marina Del Rey, Maywood, Montebello, Norwalk, Orange, Palos Verdes Estates, Paramount, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Rossmoor, San Pedro, Santa Ana, Santa Monica, Seal Beach, Signal Hill, Stanton, Torrance, Westminster



Latest Moving Tips



Below are the latest moving tips posted on our blog. Click here if you want to see more!


When is the Best Time to Move?

Moving anytime of year is difficult, but if you have a flexible schedule and are not on a specific timeline, there are several factors to consider when deciding when to move. Keep in mind that these factors could also be part of a negotiation deal with your employer if you are being relocated or if starting a new position.

The Ideal Time

If you could choose any time of the year to move, I’d suggest spring or late fall - times when it’ll be easier to find and hire movers and when rental companies are not charging the highest rates. In addition, weekend rates tend to be highest, both for truck rental agencies and some moving companies. Walsh has the same rate no matter what day you move. The times to avoid are weekends, the first of each month and summer, when moving is at its peak. Of course, most of us have other considerations, such as kids, spouses, jobs, school and a myriad of other reasons why picking our move date is difficult. Here are some considerations that most people face.

School Calendar

If you have children at home, it is best to work around the school calendar. Summer is an ideal time, as children have completed another grade and have said their goodbyes to school friends. Planning to move directly following the end of school, however, does not give your child time to adapt to the idea of moving, to say goodbye to neighborhood friends and their home. When setting the date, allow a few weeks at the new destination for children to unpack and meet new neighborhood friends. They will be better prepared for the school year if they have time to make their new house their home. Too much change can be detrimental to performance and emotional well-being.

What works best for your children, also works best for you. As part of the settling in process, take a few days for you and your child to check out the new school, meet some teachers and find appropriate transportation. Both you and your child will be better prepared, leading to a smoother transition.

Holidays and Special Occasions

When possible, avoid moving before major holidays, such as Christmas, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah or Rammadon, since part of such holidays is being with family and friends. Birthdays, anniversaries and other family events can also be difficult. Give yourself enough time in your new place before the holiday season begins to allow for you to meet new people and feel a sense of community. Better yet, save your move for immediate following a holiday. Holidays provide a perfect opportunity for goodbyes and final get-togethers.

Seasonal Considerations

Most people would agree that summer is the best time to move. Children are out of school, the weather is almost guaranteed to be perfect and friends are available to help. If this is your ideal time to move, make sure you check moving company schedules and rates before confirming your move date. Unlike Walsh, most companies have peak times and will charge higher rates accordingly. Also, if you are planning to move at peak times, you will need to be better organized to ensure that a moving company or a moving truck is available for the date and times you require. Keep in mind that the level of service often changes between the summer months, when students replace full-time experienced movers, and off-season.

As much as summer could cost you more, winter, as common sense indicates, is also not an ideal time to move. Travel is difficult, both for you and your family, along with the moving company.


Read and Understand All Information Provided by the Mover

The mover should provide you with the following basic documents as part of your move:

Estimates
The estimate should clearly describe, in writing, all charges for services the mover will perform. Make sure the estimate is signed by the mover.
Do not accept oral estimates.

Order for Service
The order for service is a list of all the services the mover will perform and shows the dates your household goods will be picked up and delivered.

Bill of Lading
The bill of lading is a contract between you and the mover and a receipt of your belongings. You should be given a partially completed copy of the bill of lading before the mover leaves the residence at origin.

Inventory List

The inventory is the receipt showing each item you shipped and its condition. Be sure you receive a written copy of the inventory after your household goods are loaded, and that you agree with its description of your household goods’ condition.


How to Stage a Home

While showing homes to a young couple with two small children I discovered a house can look too perfect. Since I just met the buyers as they had arrived in town, I didn’t have much time to schedule appointments and make my showing schedule. Some of the sellers had only a couple hours’ notice to prepare for the showings. Even with the short notice, these sellers have extremely neat homes. There was not one child’s toy left out, or book, dish, wrinkled pillow or toothbrush out of place.

The buyers kept commenting about how neat these homes were and even questioned if these occupied homes had real people living there. The houses looked too perfect. I know for a fact that one of the homes was professionally staged because the listing agent always requires her sellers to stage their homes. Some of the other houses may or may not have been professionally staged.

Staging — when done right — can help a home sell. I have seen some wonderful staging jobs. But a couple of these homes lacked that warm, lived-in feeling. This turned off the young couple with the two small children. I saw them squirm and cross their arms. They made generic statements about how this is nice and that looks pretty, but not buying-sign comments.

We saw some vacant homes and some new construction, too. Seeing these homes empty did not seem to bother the buyers, as they could see the real potential the homes offered — a clean palette, so to speak.

I showed another home that was occupied where the sellers left it neat but with a lived-in feeling. You could feel it the moment you stepped in the door. The buyers responded very favorably and started seeing themselves living there. They wanted to linger and ask questions. Yes, there were some personal family photos around, toys in the corner, things on the kitchen counter. The beds were made and the house was clean, but it felt lived in by a happy family.