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Walsh Offers:
  • Local Moving
  • Storage / Self Storage
  • Long Distance Moving
  • Guaranteed Quotes
  • Commercial Relocation
  • Free Use of Wardrobes Boxes on every move
Walsh is:
  • Licensed
  • Insured
  • Experienced
  • Family Owned & Operated

Walsh has an “A+” Rating with the Better Business Bureau. Click on the logo for a current report.

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Serving: Anaheim, Artesia, Bellflower, Buena Park, Carson, Cerritos, Compton, Costa Mesa, Culver City, Cypress, Downey, El Segundo, Fountain Valley, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Gardena, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Huntington Beach, Inglewood, Irvine, La Mirada, La Palma, Lakewood, Lawndale, Lennox, Lomita, Long Beach, Los Alamitos, Lynwood, Manhattan Beach, Marina Del Rey, Maywood, Montebello, Norwalk, Orange, Palos Verdes Estates, Paramount, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Rossmoor, San Pedro, Santa Ana, Santa Monica, Seal Beach, Signal Hill, Stanton, Torrance, Westminster



Latest Moving Tips



Below are the latest moving tips posted on our blog. Click here if you want to see more!


Read and Understand All Information Provided by the Mover

The mover should provide you with the following basic documents as part of your move:

Estimates
The estimate should clearly describe, in writing, all charges for services the mover will perform. Make sure the estimate is signed by the mover.
Do not accept oral estimates.

Order for Service
The order for service is a list of all the services the mover will perform and shows the dates your household goods will be picked up and delivered.

Bill of Lading
The bill of lading is a contract between you and the mover and a receipt of your belongings. You should be given a partially completed copy of the bill of lading before the mover leaves the residence at origin.

Inventory List

The inventory is the receipt showing each item you shipped and its condition. Be sure you receive a written copy of the inventory after your household goods are loaded, and that you agree with its description of your household goods’ condition.


How to Stage a Home

While showing homes to a young couple with two small children I discovered a house can look too perfect. Since I just met the buyers as they had arrived in town, I didn’t have much time to schedule appointments and make my showing schedule. Some of the sellers had only a couple hours’ notice to prepare for the showings. Even with the short notice, these sellers have extremely neat homes. There was not one child’s toy left out, or book, dish, wrinkled pillow or toothbrush out of place.

The buyers kept commenting about how neat these homes were and even questioned if these occupied homes had real people living there. The houses looked too perfect. I know for a fact that one of the homes was professionally staged because the listing agent always requires her sellers to stage their homes. Some of the other houses may or may not have been professionally staged.

Staging — when done right — can help a home sell. I have seen some wonderful staging jobs. But a couple of these homes lacked that warm, lived-in feeling. This turned off the young couple with the two small children. I saw them squirm and cross their arms. They made generic statements about how this is nice and that looks pretty, but not buying-sign comments.

We saw some vacant homes and some new construction, too. Seeing these homes empty did not seem to bother the buyers, as they could see the real potential the homes offered — a clean palette, so to speak.

I showed another home that was occupied where the sellers left it neat but with a lived-in feeling. You could feel it the moment you stepped in the door. The buyers responded very favorably and started seeing themselves living there. They wanted to linger and ask questions. Yes, there were some personal family photos around, toys in the corner, things on the kitchen counter. The beds were made and the house was clean, but it felt lived in by a happy family.


Wrapping How Tos

Before packing cartons, you’ll need to wrap most items to protect them from scratching and breakage. There are a variety of materials available, including bubble pack, foam peanuts and tissue. However, like most professionals Walsh uses bundles of clean, unprinted newsprint (available at our Torrance office & warehouse).

Start by placing a small stack of paper on a flat, uncluttered table or counter top. Round glasses and jars can be rolled up in two or three sheets of paper; always begin from a corner of the sheet and fold the sides in as you roll. Large or odd-shaped items require a similar technique. Place them in the center of the sheet and bring the corners together. (It may be necessary to flip the item over and wrap it again from the other side.) If in doubt, use more paper! When the corners come together, secure them with tape.

Before packing each carton, line the bottom with a few inches of wadded paper for padding. Then place large, heavy items on the bottom and lighter, more fragile items on the top. Plates, books and things of a similar shape, should be loaded vertically to utilize their own maximum structural strength. Don’t overload cartons; keep them to a manageable weight. Fill in any voids and top off loaded cartons with wadded paper. Then tape cartons securely to avoid shifting while en route.

Labeling Hints
Think about packing away a truckload of boxes and then having them delivered to your new home. How can you tell what box goes where? Labeled them, follow these tips to thwart confusion.

Use a broad, felt-tipped marker. Clearly mark your name, the room it should go to and contents on each box. Indicate “FRAGILE” on delicates; “THIS END UP” where appropriate. If available, include your bill of lading (or invoice) number and date on every box.